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Musics

Tim Garland – Return to the Fire (2015)

Tim Garland – Return to the Fire (2015)
WEB FLAC (tracks) ~ 232.75 Mb | 40:49 | Cover
Post-Bop, Third Stream | Country: UK | Label: Edition Records
I met Tim Garland through his original Enter The Fire – and I wanted some of that fire in my band – thus our long musical friendship began. This Return To The Fire shows Tim, his beautiful compositions and the band’s prowess completely. Thanks to Tim and his compadres for keeping the Music Fires burning brightly.’ CHICK COREA

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The Voltz – Thrill Ride (2018)

The Voltz – Thrill Ride (2018)
MP3 CBR 320kbps | 00:30:43 | 71.12 Mb | Cover
Classic Rock | Country: USA | Label: The Voltz
Dear Fans, After five years of performing classic rock covers and working up to originals we have it ready for you!! Here is our much anticipated debut album THRILL RIDE!!! It contains upgraded and rerecorded versions of our first to singles, What’s Your Name and Where Is The Party, from our DEMO album, and six new awesome rockin’ songs. We are excited to share our music with the world and hope you get to come to one of our shows soon!!!!
Rock On, THE VOLTZ

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The Senior Management (Goran Edman) – Heart and Soul (2018)

The Senior Management (Goran Edman) – Heart & Soul (2018)
MP3 CBR 320kbps | 00:36:33 | 84.54 Mb | Cover
Hard Rock, Country | Country: Sweden | Label: Senior Management
Today we are presenting here in exclusive the new Swedish band THE SENIOR MANAGEMENT, including into the line-up superb vocalist Goran Edman. The band’s debut Heart & Soul will be released soon, date to be announced.
In the summer of 2015 guitarist Dennis Heltorp and drummer Henrik Zetterlund formed the THE SENIOR MANAGEMENT. Together they have been involved in different music projects since the late ’80s.
During the first half of the ’90s both musicians collaborated in the band Y.M.I where they reached the finals in the Swedish Championship of Rock Music.
In the mid Nineties Y.M.I played at a rock festival and was warm up act for Billionaires Boys Club, the super-group including Jrg Fischer (Accept), Anders Johansson (Yngwie Malmsteen), Goran Edman and Magnus Rosn (Hammerfall).
Magnus was at the time in the beginning of his career and that later would bring him to several successful years with Hammerfall. Goran Edman had recently left the Yngwie Malmsteen band when he replaced Marc Boals in Billionaires Boys Club.
During this rock festival, it was the first time they all met and none had any idea that 20 years later would team up together as THE SENIOR MANAGEMENT.
When founded the band in 2015, Heltorp and Zetterlund, in order to find their sound, they did some attempts with different vocalists like Tony Martin (’80s Black Sabbath) and Jeff Scott Soto.
However, all pieces fell into place after the first demo run with Goran Edman. He finally added with his voice and amazing vocal harmonies the missing piece to complete THE SENIOR MANAGEMENT sound & style.
The band’s debut Heart & Soul is pretty unique.
THE SENIOR MANAGEMENT are unmistakably ‘Swedish’ is terms of sound, but they have something ‘special’.
Musically, they are not one trick pony for sure, mixing electric melodic rock with acoustics, then some heavy funk, classic rock and even a touch of refined AOR.
Throughout Heart & Soul there’s variety into songwriting and excellent musicianship, while Goran Edman elastic vocals are the icing on the cake. Holy smokes, this man is what I call a ‘true performer’.
At places, musically, I found some similarities to Cats In Space meets early The Poodles, but also Richie Kotzen and the good ‘ole Eagles.
But THE SENIOR MANAGEMENT are quite unique, a new fascinating and always surprising band.
Highly Recommended

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The Pat McManus Band – Tattooed In Blue (2018)

The Pat McManus Band – Tattooed In Blue (2018)
XLD Rip | FLAC (tracks+.cue, log) ~ 385.10 Mb | 53:05 | Cover
Hard Rock / Blues Rock | Country: N.Ireland | Label: The Pat McManus Band
Patrick Frances McManus was one of 6 children born into an incredibly talented musical family in Derrylin, Co.Fermangh, N.Ireland. Pat’s father, John, and his mother Valerie were highly accomplished Traditional Irish music players, so it wasn’t long before Pat and his two brothers, John and Tommy, were picking up all the instruments lying around the house and learning to play.
By the age of 7, Pat had already performed on live T.V. and by 14 he was All-Ireland Fiddle Champion. Aged 20, Pat somehow stumbled across a band called Horslips. As Horslips were a Celtic rock band, the 3 brothers could relate to their music and quickly became big fans and later attended so many gigs that they formed a friendship with the guys in the band. The brothers soon swapped their Fiddles, Uilleann Pipes and Bodhrans for electric instruments and formed their first band called – Pulse, with Pat on Guitar, John on Bass & Vocals and Tommy (who was only 12 at the time) on drums. During an interview with Radio Luxembourg , Dj Tony Prince, who remarked how young they all were, jokingly called them Mamas Boys – the boys changed their name. It was just meant to be an of the cuff’ remark but the name stuck and soon the 3 brothers were officially known as Mamas Boys.
So quickly did they begin to win over their live audiences that soon they were invited to support almost every rock band that came to Belfast or Dublin . By this time, the brothers had released their first self financed album called The Official Bootleg. It was really just a demo that had been pressed onto vinyl and sold at their gigs. The first pressing of only 1000 (which had 10 tracks) sold so quickly that it had to be repressed time and time again (this time however with only 8 tracks). The album got the band noticed in England and in 1981 Mamas Boys were invited to tour the U.K. with Hawkwind. In 1982 the band released their second self financed album Plug It In which gained great reviews and spurned the hit single Needle in The Groove. Record labels were by now fighting over the band and this saw Plug it in repackaged and re-released in the U.K. by Ultranoise and by Virgin in France . Apart from headlining their own shows the band toured with Wishbone Ash and in 1983 they released their third album Turn it Up. By now the band were so popular that Phil Lynott personally asked them if they would be his support band on Thin Lizzys’ farewell tour which also included a slot at Reading Rock.
This is where they were spotted by Jive Records who signed the band on a world wide deal (except France where they were still signed to Virgin). Mamas Boys first release for Jive was the self titled Mamas Boys album.This record was basically just the best bits of the last two records plus two new tracks, an instrumental The Professor (Pat’s nick name) and Mama Were All Crazee Now a cover of the old Slade song. A video was made to accompany this track and it gained Mamas Boys massive airplay in America with record stations playing all three versions of the track (Quiet Riot had also released the song at the same time) and asking the public to vote on which version was the best with Mamas Boys coming out on top, the majority of times. This saw the band getting some prestigious tour slots, going out in America with Ratt and Rush.
It was whilst signed to Jive that Pat first began to work as a session man for other artists which included a very wide range of acts such as John Parr, Tricky and Samantha Fox. (Pat is responsible for the guitar work on her hit single Touch Me’ and she also covered a Mamas Boys song Spirit Of America.’) In 1985 their 5 th album Power And Passion was released and after touring Europe in April and May they again headed to the States to tour with Bon Jovi and Ratt before briefly flying back to England to play the Knebworth festival with Deep Purple in front of 100,000 people. The tour ended up in Europe with Gary Moore and then onto Ireland by themselves in December of that year. Tommy, who first had been diagnosed with leukaemia aged nine had a relapse just before the second part of the European tour and had to be replaced by Jim Degrasso from Y&T, thought he was fit and well enough to complete the Irish leg of the tour. However this proved a bad decision and after the tour finished was rushed back into hospital suffering from another relapse and dehydration.
Two years passed before Mamas Boys returned with a new album Growing Up The Hard Way, a new polished sound and a new singer. Jive records had convinced the band to bring in a front man and after initially choosing a guy called Ricky Chase the band opted for ex Airrace man Keith Murrell. Keith who was a backing singer for Cliff Richard was currently plying his trade in the West End of London in the musical Time’. Unfortunately, after his second European tour with the band Keith decided to head back to the comfort of Cliff Richard and the process of looking for a new singer started again. In 1989 Connor McKeon was picked from over 500 applicants and the boys again headed out on tour in Ireland with ex- Deep Purple and Rainbow keyboard man Don Airey helping them out. The tour finished with a sell out date at the Marquee club in London . Connor, who had obviously been hit by the fame bug, then decided he wanted to pursue a solo career and soon the long process of finding another singer began again.
In 1990 the boys returned with their fourth singer in as many years Mike Wilson and another European tour was completed. In 1991 a live album Live Tonite was released on the Music For Nations label and the whole year was spent touring. In 1992 what would prove to be Mamas Boys last album Relativity was released on the CTM label. During an extensive European tour Mike Wilson met an air hostess, fell in love and walked out on the band. By this time the three brothers had had enough. As Tommy’s health had deteriorated they decided to split the band, only for Barry Hearn to ask them if he could use one of their songs from Relativety to promote a boxing match.
The band came back with a second guitarist and a new name The Government. The single Judgement Day was released and a showcase was performed for record company bosses in London on the 3 rd of August 1993 . Unfortunately Tommy was too ill to perform and after the gig The Government project was put on the back burner. Then something extraordinary happened. Due to the pressure the band had been under they had over looked the fact that Mamas Boys had been booked to play three shows in Switzerland in December of that year and as the contracts had been signed, the shows had to be honoured. On the 18 th of December 1993 at the Fuchs Rain Halle in Mohlin, Pat, John – back on vocals, Tommy and keyboard man Alan Williams played as Mamas Boys for the last time. The band had come full circle.
During 1994 Tommy’s health plummeted and rather than suffer years more of intensive pain he bravely decided to have a bone marrow transplant which took place on October the 21 st. Unfortunately, complications set in and after three and a half weeks of fighting, Tommy slipped away at 11.35pm on the 16th of November. After 18 years of intermittent suffering, Tommy was free.
After years of encouragement from fans Pat and John returned in 1997 under a new name Celtus and with a new album on the Sony record label called Moonchild which was released on the 16 th of June. This was followed straight away with a support slot on the Sheryl Crow tour, who apparently asked for the band herself as she loved the album, including a date at The Royal Albert Hall in London . In November of that year the band went out on tour again this time with Paul Carrick and to top off an incredible year on the 23 rd February 1998 the band were presented with the Irish World Music awards Best Album Of The Year award, beating off stiff competition from U2, The Corrs and Enya.
The band, who were selling out The Borderline in London every month, then went out on a five week 23 date tour with Paul Carrick again. Apart from coming out of the recording studio to do a few festivals in the summer, the rest of the year was spent recording the follow up to Moonchild. In March of 1999 the band did a headlining tour of England to showcase the new material and on the 26 th July the second album Portrait was released. The rest of that year was spent extensively touring, including support slots with Deacon Blue and Jimmy Nail. Incredibly, with the 3 rd single from the album already pressed and due for a January 2000 release and after playing to approximately 50,000 people in the previous three months, Sony decided to drop the band on Christmas day 1999.
Undeterred, the band recorded their third album Rooted on their own record label and headed on tour that March, selling the album at the gigs and through the fan club. Celtus were still a very big attraction live and that summer they were invited to play the Irish Festival at Finsbury Park London . The rest of 2000 was spent with the band writing and recording material for a new studio album. A new record contract was secured with Evangeline Records who first released a live album called Live 2000 and then on 26 th February 2001 released Celtus’ fifth and final album What Goes Around. A fifteen date headlining tour of England still proved how popular Celtus were but Pat, who had become a father a few years previous, had become more and more disillusioned with the record industry, decided to move back to the shores of Lough Erne, to bring his daughter up in the surroundings in which he grew up, rather than the hussle and bussle of London.
When home in Ireland Pat began work as a session man and soon began teaching music. After a while a local band who had just lost their guitarist called The Painkillers approached Pat and asked him if he could help them out for a few gigs. After a bit of persuasion Pat agreed and soon he had the bug again and Pat McManus and The Painkillers began touring the length of Ireland . During late 2003 while working on their album Blue Flowers at Mid Atlantic studios in Enniskillen, Pat became a full time member of Sligo band Indian For the next year and a half Pat toured with both bands Indian and The Painkillers. In February 2005 Pat decided a more professional approach was needed and left The Painkillers and in April of that year returned with a completely new band. Pat McManus and Hi-Voltage played their first gig in Cavan on the 1st of April 2005 and toured extensively throughout Ireland for the next couple of years. In 2007 Pat recorded his first solo album In My Own Time which gained fantastic reviews in the press and was also released throughout Europe by Bad Reputation Records of France complete with a different cover.
A series of European gigs were booked which went down so well that the band were invited back time and time again. Around this time Pat decided that a fresh approach was needed and completely changed his rhythm section of the band. The band evolved into the ‘Pat McManus Band’ with Paul Faloon on drums and Gordon Sheridan on Bass and in late 2008 the band recorded a live DVD in France,which has been a sell-out since it’s release.
In 2009 Pat, Paul and Gordon extensively toured throughout Europe, returning to the well established venues and many new ones. This included several festivals such as ‘The Harley Davidson Festival’ in ST.Tropez, ‘Rock The Wolves’ in Switzerland, ‘The Guitar Festival’ in Corsica, ‘ST.Julian Guitar Festival’ in Geneva and ‘Raismes Fest’ in France. At the ‘Raismes Fest’ a live DVD was filmed, which was released in March 2010. The band also collaborated with guests Andy Powell of Wishbone Ash’ and Bernie Marsden formerly of ‘Whitesnake’ and ‘Alaska’. Although continually touring the band recorded a second studio CD, which was launched in Paris and Dublin in September 2009. Titled ‘2pm’ the CD showcases 14 new tracks written by Pat and all the reviews have been positive and complimentary. 2010 is set to be another great year for the ‘PMB’, with a packed tour schedule ahead, more possible collaborations and a third album already started, with a projected release date of October 2010……

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The Larry Goldings Trio – Moonbird (1999)

The Larry Goldings Trio – Moonbird (1999)
MP3 CBR 320kbps | 00:54:54 | 125.90 Mb | Cover
Contemporary Jazz, Soul-Jazz, Post Bop | Country: USA | Label: Palmetto Records
Like Barbara Dennerlein, Larry Goldings was among the few organists who, in the 1980s and ’90s, refused to stick to a grits-and-gravy approach to the instrument. This isn’t to say that Goldings has escaped Jimmy Smith’s influence altogether or that he lacks funk, blues, and soul-jazz credentials – one of his employers, after all, was Maceo Parker, who spent many years in James Brown’s band. But Goldings hasn’t ignored the post-bop challenges that Larry Young presented, and Young’s influence can be felt on Moonbird.
Joined by drummer Bill Stewart and the Grant Green-influenced guitarist Peter Bernstein, Goldings delivers a rewarding post-bop date that will hardly be mistaken for Smith-minded soul-jazz. Goldings originals like the congenial Christine, the intriguing Empty Oceans, and the cerebal Xoloft aren’t innovative – 35 years earlier, Young was playing post-bop on the Hammond B-3. But Goldings nonetheless comes across as his own man, and his refusal to be yet another Jimmy Smith clone is commendable. The Bostonian also deserves applause for successfully transforming Randy Newman’s I Think It’s Going to Rain Today and Joni Mitchell’s Woodstock into improvisatory jazz – at a time when too many jazzmen were content to play the same old Cole Porter and Irving Berlin songs time and time again, Goldings had enough imagination to find the jazz potential in pop/rock songs that more myopic improvisers were ignoring. Not quite a gem but definitely solid, Moonbird is a CD that post-bop fans will enjoy. ~ AllMusic Review by Alex Henderson

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The Gathering Britannia – The Bridge Between (2011)

The Gathering Britannia – The Bridge Between (2011)
EAC Rip | FLAC (image+.cue, log) ~ 374.06 Mb + 90.54 Mb (Scans) | 55:49
Folk | Country: England | Label: Its About Music Com. – IAM0277
The Gathering Britannia is made up of some of the UK’s best artists, but please don’t call them a supergroup, they’re much more down to earth. The band is made up of the following legends: Jerry Donahue, (Fairport Convention, Fotheringay, to name a few), plays guitars; Rick Kemp, (Steeleye Span), on bass and vocals; Clive Bunker, (Jethro Tull and Pentangle), on drums, of course; Ray Jackson, (Lindisfarne), on mandolin, vocals, and harmonica; Doug Morter, (Albion Band and Magna Carta), plays guitars and sings vocals; and Kristina Donahue, (Fairport Convention guest), sings vocals.
This is an excellent and original sounding collaboration of some of the UK’s best performing and most talented musicians. Excellent work delivering some solid hits and showing the UK’s new talent where history was made with folk music and the blues.
‘Fire on the Line’ opens with bright acoustic guitar and harmonica. Then the chorus begins without music accompaniment, Will we be too late to celebrate, when the curtain of the century comes down Then the full capacity of the sound opens up along with mandolin and drums. A great folksy opening to this project. There’s a fire on the line. Going to slow this old engine down. Ah, the effects of global warming, addressed within a bouncy folk tune.
‘Lady Eleanor’ is one of my favorite tracks on the album, and the wonderful mix of acoustic guitar, mandolin, and soft drums are the main reason. A story set to song like it used to be back in the 60s and 70s.
‘Deep in the Darkest Night’ opens slowly with soft drums, bass, and electric guitar. Then Kristina Donahue brings back memories of early Stevie Nicks with, Deep in the darkest night under a midnight blue. The mandolin with guitar and drum support helps weave a wonderful tale full of emotional support, with Kristina warmly and softly singing.
Sly electric and bass guitar open ‘Don’t Make Me Old’, with some great harmonica supporting. Then vocals that bring back memories of Boz Scaggs’ funkier side. A fun song full of solid guitar and some of the best harmonica on the album. You can tell they’re having some fun on this one.
‘This Has Got to End’ is a sad song about breaking up. Good vocals, soft drums, bass, and electric guitar mixed with mandolin. Kristina balances out the male chorus of vocals well. The harmonica solos help add to the sadness and the emotion of the song.
‘I Don’t Want’ is a good funky blues song, full of great vocals, slow guitar and solid drums. The harmonica adds great emotion to the piece. Brings back memories of some of Dire Straits’ songs with the slow electric guitar solos.
‘For Shame of Doing Wrong’ opens full of flash, like a Who song, full of drums, cymbals, bass, and lead guitar. Then Kristina begins singing and they turn it into a good straight ahead rocker. The guitar solos and drumming are excellent.
‘Rocking the Dog’ is another of the best tracks on the album. It’s an instrumental track, allowing all musicians to individually showcase their talents. Everything is here, from excellent harmonica, good supporting bass, solid in step drumming, and of course excellent bluesy electric lead guitar soloing.
‘Back on Your Own Again’ opens slow with bass and lead guitar before the mandolin joins in to give it just the right amount of tinge of folk. Another story set to music.
‘False Hands (Across the Table)’ is a slow bluesy/country western sounding track set to slow electric guitar, bass, and mandolin. It doesn’t really get interesting until that cool harmonica darts in. Then it takes on more of that Dire Straights’ feel.
‘King’s Cross Blues’ takes us on a bluegrass ride through the country, full of harmonica, and country twang on the guitar and vocals.
‘Brampton to Roadhead’ opens like some early Jethro Tull, with excellent harmonica, drums, bass, and great lead electric guitar. Good vocals help bring forward the storyline. The guitar soloing is an excellent way to close the album.
~ review by Mark Johnson

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The Clayton Brothers – Siblingity (2000)

The Clayton Brothers – Siblingity (2000)
EAC Rip | FLAC (image+.cue, log) ~ 337.66 Mb + 43.12 Mb (Scans) | 66:59
Jazz, Bop, Swing | Country: USA | Label: Qwest / Warner Bros – 9362-47813-2
Brothers John and Jeff Clayton are very much in the Wynton Marsalis-originated school of revisionist jazz, which holds that the clock should be turned back to the 1945-1965 era of bebop, post-bop, hard bop, and cool jazz, with Ornette Coleman’s free jazz innovations left out, and of course not a hint of fusion. On their fifth album, the brothers are joined by their regular pianist, Bill Cunliffe, and newly added trumpeter Terell Stafford, with drummer Jeff Hamilton (also of the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra) rejoining.
The inclusion of Stafford is crucial, since it makes the ensemble more of a traditional jazz group, led by two horns; his presence sometimes suggests the Miles Davis Quintet when it featured John Coltrane. Whereas Expressions, their last album, could have passed for a Jeff Clayton solo album, Siblingity sounds like the work of a band of equals. Another change is the greater number of original compositions, with one Clayton or the other taking at least a co-writing credit on ten of 11 tracks. They hedge their bets, however, often using jazz standards to frame and introduce their originals. This time, John Clayton Jr. has not been content to produce the record and remain in the background; he has some attractive arco playing, and naturally makes the most of Tricotism, a bass showcase. As is so often the case with neo-traditionalists in any style of music, the listener is constantly reminded of the players who originated this style of music. And with the heroes of the past perpetually available on disc, the question remains, why not purchase something by Miles Davis or Cannonball Adderley for the same money and get similar music played by its originators Maybe just because the Claytons are alive and working, and their musical evolution is still ongoing. Siblingity finds them stepping – just barely – forward from the traditions in which they are steeped, and they are the better for it. ~ AllMusic Review by William Ruhlmann

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TBelly – Dead Men Don't Pray (2015)

TBelly – Dead Men Don’t Pray (2015)
WEB FLAC (tracks) ~ 263.59 Mb | 43:23 | Cover
Blues | Country: England (Brighton, East Sussex) | Label: ECR Music Group
The truth is, I didn’t discover the blues. It discovered me. This may be true for many blues fans and musicians around the world, but it comes as something of a surprise when spoken by Russell Keefe, long-time keyboardist for Les McKeown’s legendary Bay City Rollers. Many people (in the UK, at least) associate the Bay City Rollers with slightly saccharine early-1970s pop music. By contrast, Dead Men Don’t Pray is a powerful and highly enjoyable slab of muscular, modern blues-rock played by Keefe’s new band, TBelly.
Al Richardson’s choppy solo harmonica riff opens the first track on the album, Tie It On My Face, quickly joined by drums and a superb bouncing bass line before the vocals and other instruments help to build up a driving, classic rock song. The band is a top drawer ensemble, playing with a delicate balance of authority and edge-of-the-seat abandon. Kevin Magill and Riad Abji form a rock solid rhythm section (the groove on the title track could wake the dead, even if they don’t then pray), with Debs Bonomini adding backing vocals and acoustic guitar. Ross Ian Lardner contributes a number of superb, melodic guitar solos on tracks like I’ll Get You Home and Best Out Of You. The electric guitar is the primary solo instrument on the album, which is perhaps a shame, not as any criticism of Lardner, but simply because Keefe is clearly a first-rate ivory tickler and it would have been good to hear him stretch out himself on occasion. Instead, the keys add flashes of supportive color to songs like Where’s The Doctor, Dead Men Don’t Pray and Lie In The Desert. What Keefe does bring to this particular party however is his songwriting and his voice.
He wrote or co-wrote 10 of the songs on the album (Lardner contributed Respectable Man and co-wrote Broken with Keefe) and there isn’t a dud on display. With clever lyrics and a nice line in half-rhymes (Nearly free, I have one foot out of the grave. So for the rest of my days, there’ll be times when the dead men don’t pray.), memorable vocal melodies (the unexpected line over the acoustic guitar introduction to Best Out Of You is particularly catching) and intelligently written tracks (Night At The Ritz goes from jazz to rock and back to jazz with lan), many of which benefit from catchy choruses (perhaps some of that BCR influence did rub off after all), the songs all stand by themselves. When combined with Keefe’s voice, however, they evolve into something altogether different. Keefe is blessed with a deep, rough-hewn voice that comes from the same stable as Tom Waits, Joe Cocker and John Campbell whilst retaining its own timbre and tone. Another point of reference could be the great Lee Brilleaux, whose voice carried a similar undercurrent of danger and violence, even on the rare love songs that Dr Feelgood recorded.
This is blues-rock in the best sense of the term. It is not an album of over-played, over-driven, simplistic twaddle. It is album of maturity and depth, played with emotional sincerity and technical prowess.
Dead Men Don’t Pray was recorded at Brighton Electric Studios in England and Paul Win Winstanley deserves kudos for capturing a superb sound. The album is also nicely packaged in a smart cardboard gatefold sleeve. Altogether, it is a very impressive effort from TBelly. If you like your rock with a heavy slice of blues in every track, this album is for you. ~ review BY RHYS WILLIAMS

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TAUK – Shapeshifter I ~ Construct (EP) (2018)

TAUK – Shapeshifter I: Construct (EP) (2018)
WEB FLAC (tracks) ~ 181.05 Mb | 27:53 | Cover
Fusion, Jazz-Rock, Progressive Rock | Country: USA | Label: TAUK
On their upcoming EP Shapeshifter I: Construct, TAUK tap into their singular chemistry to elevate and expand their all-instrumental blend of funk, hip-hop, progressive rock, and jazz. Revealing both their refined musicality and unbridled creativity, the Oyster Bay, New York-bred rock-fusion four-piece (guitarist Matt Jalbert, bassist Charlie Dolan, keyboardist Alric A.C. Carter, and drummer Isaac Teel) push into new sonic terrain and build entire worlds within each richly textured soundscape.
From the complex twisting of For Laughing Out Loud and soaring riffs of Malware to the urgent rhythms of Stranger Danger and sprawling melodies of Premises, Shapeshifter I: Construct finds TAUK introducing a rhythmically adventurous element to their craft. And while the compositions are meticulously focused, TAUK also deliver the dynamic tension-and-release jams that have helped earn them a devoted following while drawing critical acclaim (the Washington Post, for one, praised TAUK for creating a hard-charging, often melodic fusion thatthanks to a penchant for improvoffers limitless possibilities).
Throughout Shapeshifter I: Constructthe first chapter in a follow-up to their 2016 album Sir NebulaTAUK employ a guided approach to steer their music into bold new directions. The band has sharpened their songwriting to craft more intricately layered arrangements and powerfully intense grooves. As with their past releases, TAUK created Shapeshifter I in collaboration with Grammy Award-winning producer/mixer/engineer Robert Carranza (The Mars Volta, Ozomatli, Jack Johnson, Taj Mahal). But in a departure from their previous work, the band made the new EP and upcoming full length album in one concentrated period in one location rather than moving between studios. The group brought their gear into an old house, creating a unique recording situation with a special atmosphere. Holing up in the makeshift studio, often pulling 12-hour workdays, TAUK ultimately found the revamped recording process hugely beneficial. Everything just happened so naturally this time around, says Jalbert. I can’t think of one moment where it felt like anything was forced. We were all just completely focused and in the same mindset, which made this an incredibly fun and smooth experience.
TAUK’s creative connection traces back to childhood, when longtime friends Dolan, Jalbert, and Carter formed their first band in seventh grade and held practice in their school basement. After playing together in various projects over the years, the trio brought Teel into the fold in 2012, cementing the final lineup. We gelled pretty quickly as friends and as musicians, and now there’s a connection on stage that’s unspoken, notes Teel. You just feel it from the energy within the band and from the response coming from the crowdall these people in the same exact headspace.
Since their formation, TAUK have shared stages with an impressive list of bands (including Umphrey’s McGee, Widespread Panic, Lettuce, and Robert Randolph) in addition to appearing at festivals like Electric Forest, Bonnaroo, and The Allman Brothers’ Peach Music Festival. That rigorous touring schedule has gone a long way in strengthening their chemistry, according to Carter. We’re doing over 100 shows a year and we pretty much live with each other, so there’s a healthy respect and trust and love happening there, he says. We all have a common goal and an understanding that this is something we’re compelled to do, and that’s definitely brought us close together. It’s also helped TAUK develop a reputation as a masterful live act: TAUK is unstoppable, raved Live for Live Music. If you haven’t see them, dear God, go.
Preparing to hit the road again for a spring tour (with upcoming dates including a two-night stint at the Brooklyn Bowl and spots on the Boston Calling Music Festival and Sweetwater 420 Fest and EP Release shows in Ft Collins and Denver on 4/6 and 4/7), TAUK is focused on instilling their live show with the same kinetic energy and boundless passion that powered the making of Shapeshifter I. Growing up together as musicians and collectively going on this journeythat’s what makes this experience really special, says Jalbert of TAUK’s continued evolution. It’s like everything we’ve learned over the years has been funneled into this band, and now it’s taking shape in a really exciting way. We all love what we’re doing, and the band just feels like home.

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Tangekanic – Hotel Cantaffordit (2018)

Tangekanic – Hotel Cantaffordit (2018)
EAC Rip | FLAC (tracks+.cue, log) ~ 413.75 Mb | 1:17:22 | Scans included
Progressive Rock | Label: Reingold Records – RRCD016
The Tangekanic Live album made on the USA leg of the 2017 tour. Tangekanic is a hybrid band playing music by The Tangent and Karmakanic. Feature Jonas Reingold, Andy Tillison, Luke Machin, Goran Edman and Steve Roberts. Mainly new material is on show here showing the two bands off at their best – tracks include Karmakanic’s epic God The Universe and Everythings Else No-One Really Cares About and The Tangent’s hard hitting instrumental Doctor Livingstone I Presume. More than an hour of great music including a track unavailable anywhere else…
Tangekanic release their debut physical product in the form of a live album HOTEL CANTAFFORDIT recorded on one night in a nice tight New Jersey club right at the end of the USA leg of their 2017 tour.
Tangekanic is a touring unit that plays the music of both The Tangent and Karmakanic and features members of both, working together in one collaborative set.
The shows were exceptionally well recieved:
One of the most moving performances this humble reviewer has ever witnessed.. this was a performance few present will ever forget ROCK SOCIETY magazine
This is an effortless masterclass through some of the finest songs the bands have to offer PROG Magazine
We went across Europe and took the rather mad decision to go to the States too says Flower Kings/Tangent/Karmakanic/Steve Hackett bass player Jonas Reingold. We overcame a lot of problems and went and played our music to the world and fortunately the world seemed to quite like it
Especially Micro-Polynesia apparently, as Jonas explains on the album. As the rag-tag band of rebellious prog rockers traversed continents in uncomfortable vans, stayed in horrible (and lovely) hotels, fought their way through the sea of bureaucracy to get into the USA, got searched and starved in Switzerland, waited in the rain for breakdown trucks, lost hotels in the dark, and lived on a finely balanced shoestring tightrope for a couple of months they managed to do the shows missing one of the members who had been forced to pull out days before the tour began. They wrote a song behind stage in the hour before their show at the UK Summers End festival and blew the house down with it. They played in the open air during a thunderstorm, they had one gig cancelled in the USA without the owner bothering to contact them they didn’t get paid at a gig in Germany despite having a great night there, and they didn’t for one second think of packing up and going home.
Those lucky enough to see the tour were unaware that in 2017 THREE members of the band would be recognised in an important magazine’s poll and gain top five instrumentalist ratings in their categories, Luke Machin coming in at #5 guitarist, Jonas Reingold as #5 bassist, Andy Tillison as #1 keyboards player in the PROG magazine poll and not only that but the Tangent’s 2017 studio album The Slow Rust Of Forgotten Machinery also made #5.
Now’s the time for you to check out the opinions of the magazines, the polls, the publicity, whatever. You can hear Tangekanic play a set of songs from their most recent output on this one hour plus real live recording.. (not a studio album with audience noise), crowd funded by the band’s most loyal supporters. Made in a small intimate venue that has for years championed progressive Music in the USA, the New Jersey Proghouse. Hear Karmakanic’s half hour epic God The Universe and Everything Else Nobody Really cares About butted up to The Tangent’s straight between the eyes instrumental Doctor Livingstone I Presume and yes, you can get to hear the track that got everyone talking Sanctuary In Music complete with its 30 seconds of silence for the victims of three concert massacres of recent years.
It was the boldest and most amazing of adventures.

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